Glass Plate
Negatives - SET 10

People and Porches

Charlie Coulter Collection CC_B4_04

102 Lindsay Street

Lindsay was the first street surveyed outside of the original town of Chattanooga. It’s named for Colonel William Lindsay, a military officer involved in the tumultuous and tragic Cherokee Removal. In May of 1837, Lindsay was instructed to arrest John Ross and turn him over to the civil authorities in case he did ‘anything further calculated to excite a spirit of hostility among the Cherokees on the subject of removal.’ But that threat was not acted on.

Lindsay bought 104 acres around the bluffs above the city in 1838. Unfortunately, Lindsay died in October of that same year.

Just two months later, the citizens of Ross’s Landing renamed the town as Chattanooga.

Recently I identified the location of this photo. Like many, it was taken near a known photographers home, Charles G. Walline, who lived at 107 Payne Street. The video here provides the proof and methods used to confirm the location. Unfortunately, I have not been able to determine who the people on the porch were. I have little doubt the old man was filled with amazing stories.

Charlie Coulter Collection CC_B4_09

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Posed Neighbors

Again, I cannot definitively identify who they were, but are likely neighbors in the Lindsay / Payne Street area. Based on the topography, they're likely on the side facing the river as the terrain falls off toward the shoreline.

Wrinkles and Lace

The immaculate details in the fabric and facial expressions leave much to the imagination. There is a likelihood that the young girl is the granddaughter of the older lady.

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‘Stoic Porchism’

At the end of the 19th century, the older generations especially were not sure how to react to a camera. Smiles were more likely to be seen in younger generations who more quickly understood the value of the moment captured in time.

Kimono Party

Without photos like this we may have been deprived of learning about the ‘kimono party fad’; an example of Japonism in the first years of the 20th century.

If you have never attended a kimono party you have missed out a great pleasure. They are quite the latest for hot weather and may be indulged in by the girl who has but one room in which to entertain or by the rich who have all the luxury and comforts of a large home.
Cherry blossoms, artificial of course, lanterns, fans, parasols, etc. carry out the Japanese idea that is desired. The chief object of a kimono party is to provide comfort for those invited so that the modes for entertaining can not be limited. Intimate friends will find pleasure in toasting marshmallows over a lamp in true college girl style, talking, sewing, singing around the piano or playing fan-tan with chips, if cards are not objectionable.
The Des Moines Register Friday, July 6, 1906

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If you have never attended a kimono party you have missed out a great pleasure. They are quite the latest for hot weather and may be indulged in by the girl who has but one room in which to entertain or by the rich who have all the luxury and comforts of a large home.
Cherry blossoms, artificial of course, lanterns, fans, parasols, etc. carry out the Japanese idea that is desired. The chief object of a kimono party is to provide comfort for those invited so that the modes for entertaining can not be limited. Intimate friends will find pleasure in toasting marshmallows over a lamp in true college girl style, talking, sewing, singing around the piano or playing fan-tan with chips, if cards are not objectionable.
The Des Moines Register Friday, July 6, 1906

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1 Lindsay Street

Today, this address is occupied by the 525 Battery Place Apartments. Much of the stone wall seen here still remains. Beginning in 1898, the residents here were the Storey family, Alonzo, and his wife Roxa, several daughters, and grandchildren.

UPDATE: Thanks to Dave Holliday for uncovering the likely word and meaning of the sign on the house.
Equa’nulti is Cherokee for 'Living by the river'. One Lindsay Street had a wonderful view of it.